Prisma migrate database access denied

K

Kevin Bryan

Guest
Kevin Bryan Asks: Prisma migrate database access denied
When I try to run the command npx prisma migrate dev --name init I get this error message:

Code:
Error: P1010: User `johndoe` was denied access on the database `mydb.public`

I don't remember setting up a user "jhondoe", I just installed postgres desktop on my mac and that's it. I'm new to databases and backend dev so I'm not sure if I did setup a user.

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How to perform feature selection with Categorical Variables and Continuous Target, provided that data is not normally distributed?

Ahmed Jyad Asks: How to perform feature selection with Categorical Variables and Continuous Target, provided that data is not normally distributed?
I am trying a use multi linear regression model to predict the salaries of employees. I have a total of 88 dependent features from which 19 are categorical and the rest are continuous. I have managed to reduced the number of continuous features from 69 to 41. Now I am trying to reduce the number of categorical features, but since my data is not normally distributed I cannot use a t-test or ANOVA. Which other tests can I use to see if the features are significant to predict the target?

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[Solved] How to export(writeRaster) single raster from multi-band stack/brick/spatraster one by one using R?

  • jackywang
  • Geography
  • Replies: 0
jackywang Asks: How to export(writeRaster) single raster from multi-band stack/brick/spatraster one by one using R?
Code:
library(terra)

a=rast(nrows=10,ncols=10,vals=1:100)

b=rast(nrows=10,ncols=10,vals=1:100)

c=rast(nrows=10,ncols=10,vals=1:100)

test <- c(a,b,c)

for (i in 1:3) 
{
  r=test[[i]]
  writeRaster(r,paste0("E:/test",i,'.tif'))
}

This is my way to do it. I want to know is there a easier way to do it?

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Does negative overlap actually exist in any compound?

  • Bread Butter
  • Chemistry
  • Replies: 0
Bread Butter Asks: Does negative overlap actually exist in any compound?
The orbital overlap concept discusses +ve, zero and -ve overlapping. But if -ve overlapping leads to repulsive interactions then it should not exist right? Because if the orbitals are repulsive, why would they overlap? Are there any real compounds in which this overlap is shown? If not, then does it have any theoretical significance, that is, does it help us explain some bonding phenomena which would not be explainable without assuming a -ve overlap?

Moreover, why does negative overlap which is repulsive occur between oppositely charged lobes which seems contradictory (to me) since they should be attractive if they are oppositely charged.

I am new to the "Hybridisation" concept so I am very sorry if my question sounds silly! :)

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Theory of physical causality?

  • AGML
  • Physics
  • Replies: 0
AGML Asks: Theory of physical causality?
There's a fairly well-developed tradition of "causal structure" in relativity theory and in relativistic quantum theory, which essentially determines which events in spacetime are "causally connected" to one another. Essentially, an event in the rear light cone of another can hypothetically be its cause; otherwise it cannot be.

On the other hand, there is now also a pretty well-developed statistical theory of causality, well known to practitioners in machine learning, that formalizes causal relationships between statements, in terms of Bayesian graphs and so on.

I am looking for a physical theory that unifies these two notions, by formalizing and ideally quantifying the extent to which two physical events are actual, instead of potential, causes of one another.

One would expect such a theory to assign "zero" causation to causally disconnected events in the relativistic sense. But presumably not all events in another event's past are, in fact, important "causes". E.g. the fact that my fingers are striking the keys on my keyboard is presumably a more important "cause" of you reading this text than is the Moon's position 10,000 years ago, even though both events are in your rear light cone.

Has such a theory been developed? Could anyone briefly explicate it, or point to references which do? I'm looking for a classical theory here mostly, but a quantum generalization (presumably relating 'causation' to 'entanglement' or something) would also be interesting.

SolveForum.com may not be responsible for the answers or solutions given to any question asked by the users. All Answers or responses are user generated answers and we do not have proof of its validity or correctness. Please vote for the answer that helped you in order to help others find out which is the most helpful answer. Questions labeled as solved may be solved or may not be solved depending on the type of question and the date posted for some posts may be scheduled to be deleted periodically. Do not hesitate to share your thoughts here to help others.

What is the difference between conventional thermocouples and differential thermocouples? And how to calibrate the differential thermocouples?

  • Ziming Wu
  • Physics
  • Replies: 0
Ziming Wu Asks: What is the difference between conventional thermocouples and differential thermocouples? And how to calibrate the differential thermocouples?
I am now setting up thermal transport measurement device for small diameter sample. I found a model, metioned in this paper(https://doi.org/10.1063/1.1347980), callled parallel thermal conductance technique (namely PTC).

In this technique, a differential thermocouple, made by Constantan–Chromega–Constantan, was used.

I wonder if there is any difference between conventional thermocouples and differential thermocouples? Is the differential thermocouple just formed by two thermocouples connected in series?Or whether there are specific differential thermocouples for sale (just like the second picture)?

And another question is how can I establish a mapping figure of ΔT and ΔV and how to calibrate them?

Thanks a lot!

enter image description here enter image description here

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Is there any proof of Galilean Transformation?

  • abcxyzklmn
  • Physics
  • Replies: 0
abcxyzklmn Asks: Is there any proof of Galilean Transformation?
Is there any proof of Galilean Transformation? Is it proved from experiment, theory or it simply is an axiom?

SolveForum.com may not be responsible for the answers or solutions given to any question asked by the users. All Answers or responses are user generated answers and we do not have proof of its validity or correctness. Please vote for the answer that helped you in order to help others find out which is the most helpful answer. Questions labeled as solved may be solved or may not be solved depending on the type of question and the date posted for some posts may be scheduled to be deleted periodically. Do not hesitate to share your thoughts here to help others.

Static electrification of the same material at different temperatures

  • David Espinoza
  • Physics
  • Replies: 0
David Espinoza Asks: Static electrification of the same material at different temperatures
In the following books it is stated that when you have 2 samples of the same material at different temperatures and they are rubbed together, the colder one gets electrified positively, the hotter one negatively.

https://books.google.com.pe/books?i...&hl=fr#v=onepage&q="le plus échauffé"&f=false

https://archive.org/details/electricity00fergrich/page/70/mode/2up?q="colder+or+the+smoother"

https://archive.org/details/courseoflectures00forbuoft/page/n21/mode/2up?q="hot+piece+of+cork"

Now, in principle I would expect the opposite to happen because of thermionic emission. The hotter one would lose more electrons and thus be electrified positively, yet the opposite happens. Maybe the reduction of conductivity in metals at higher temperatures would account for this phenomenon? But that would not explain why this phenomenon also happens in non-metals. I am quite puzzled, any help in the matter would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

SolveForum.com may not be responsible for the answers or solutions given to any question asked by the users. All Answers or responses are user generated answers and we do not have proof of its validity or correctness. Please vote for the answer that helped you in order to help others find out which is the most helpful answer. Questions labeled as solved may be solved or may not be solved depending on the type of question and the date posted for some posts may be scheduled to be deleted periodically. Do not hesitate to share your thoughts here to help others.